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Bridging The Gap
Sudan protesters reject army's position on civilian rule
  Friday 03 May, 2019
Sudan protesters reject army\'s position on civilian rule

Protesters in Sudan have criticised the ruling military council after it said it would not accept a civilian-majority power sharing council.

A top military council official earlier told the BBC that a transitional supreme council could not be dominated by civilians.

But an opposition spokesman said the military did not understand civilian government.

Talks between the military and the opposition remain deadlocked.

President Omar al-Bashir was ousted from power on 11 April after 30 years.

He was replaced by a transitional military council that promised to relinquish power to civilians within two years - a proposal rejected by protesters.

Demonstrators are continuing their mass sit-in outside military HQ to demand that the army cede control.

Protest leaders accuse the military of not negotiating in good faith and promoting the interests of Mr Bashir.

The military leaders say that they need to be in charge to ensure order and security in the country.
Who's in charge of Sudan?

The seven-member transitional military council led by Lt-Gen Abdel Fattah Abdelrahman Burhan is currently in charge.

Both it and the protesters have agreed that the next government will be made up of technocrats, not well-known politicians or the military, says the BBC's James Copnall in Khartoum.

But there would also be a supreme council, which would be above the government. Its composition and exact powers are still a subject of negotiation.

This supreme council replaces the president, and ensures that the military can retain relevance and power, while the civilians run the actual government business, our reporter says.

Lt Gen Salah Abdelkhalek told the BBC's Newsday programme that the military would insist on having at least half of all seats on the new supreme council: "[It's] a red line, maybe half and half," he said.

Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-48155284

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